jane’s walk

Inspired by Jane Jacobs Jane’s Walk is happening this weekend in Toronto.

For those who don’t know, Jane Jacobs was an urbanist and activist.  Despite the fact that she had no formal training, her visionary views of the set up and functions of cities have made her be considered an expert in the field.  I personally read The Death and Life of Great American Cities for a university course, and remember loving her approach to looking at urban environments as holistic ecological systems.

Under the seeming disorder of the old city, wherever the old city is working successfully, is a marvelous order for maintaining the safety of the streets and the freedom of the city. It is a complex order. Its essence is intricacy of sidewalk use, bringing with it a constant succession of eyes. This order is all composed of movement and change, and although it is life, not art, we may fancifully call it the art form of the city and liken it to the dance — not to a simple-minded precision dance with everyone kicking up at the same time, twirling in unison and bowing off en masse, but to an intricate ballet in which the individual dancers and ensembles all have distinctive parts which miraculously reinforce each other and compose an orderly whole. The ballet of the good city sidewalk never repeats itself from place to place, and in any once place is always replete with new improvisations.

You can see all of the walks happening in Toronto here.  Some of them sound very interesting and I am hoping to make it out to at least one.

Thousands of people have taken part in a Jane’s Walk. Past walks have explored a wide range of urban landscapes, from social housing slated for redevelopment to areas with a rich architectural and cultural heritage, to teen hangouts and secret gardens.  Walks are led by individuals and small groups. Some are focused around historical themes more than geographical areas, for instance, some strolls have been built around ideas like the urban forestry, gay and lesbian history, places of relevance to the homeless, the history of ‘skid row’, and urgent planning matters facing certain neighbourhood. The walks offer a more personal take on local culture and issues. They are not a tourist driven initiative but an insider tour of a neighbourhood that helps open up a friendly, engaged discussion amongst interested participants.

Cities have the capability of providing something for everybody, only because, and only when, they are created by everybody.

Cities have the capability of providing something for everybody, only because, and only when, they are created by everybody.

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